May 12, 2020 | Blog, Reflections

Water is about more than just thirst

Access to fresh water means so much more to vulnerable communities than having something to drink. Clean water has the power to transform how people live their lives.

In Tharparkar, Pakistan, one of the most drought-impacted regions of the world – IDRF has brought clean water to people’s doorsteps. Women no longer have to walk 4 or 5 hours each day to fetch water, freeing them up to earn money for their family and for girls to go to school. 

In Turkey, Internally Displaced Persons camps for Syrians who have fled the decade-long civil war, ensuring that clean water is available has prevented the outbreak of communicable disease in places where some families live with over 10 people in one tent.

In the Rohingya Refugee camps in Bangladesh, the availability of water across Cox’s Bazar protects women and girls from assault and other violent crimes, as they no longer need to venture into dangerous areas without adequate lighting and security.

In Gaza’s schools, the 10 clean water tankers that deliver fresh water daily ensure children learn in a safe environment and gives their parents a sense of peace and optimism. 

In Yemen, clean water and hydration provide a path to recovery for patients suffering from the worst cholera outbreak in human history in a country already hurting from famine, conflict and a massive economic crisis.   

Having access to clean and safe water necessitates so many other aspects of life that we take for granted.The world’s 65 million refugees that have been forcibly displaced, by either civil war or disaster often have to choose between their own safety and their family’s survival.

Many of the camps I’ve visited have neither wells nor community water points. Their ability to gather water depends on how able-bodied different members of their family are and if they have the capability to carry the water on their journey back.

Access to fresh water means so much more to vulnerable communities than having something to drink. Clean water has the power to transform how people live their lives.

Farook Yusoof is a Program Manager who has worked with IDRF for the past two years. His portfolio mainly consists of responses to protracted conflicts or natural disasters. In his time here, he has managed programming in Yemen, Syria, Somalia, , Gaza and many others. Farook also oversees some of IDRF’s education initiatives in Pakistan and Gaza. Prior to this, Farook worked within the humanitarian and development network, deploying to various complex emergency and disaster settings, including; Philippines, Nepal, Ukraine, Haiti and Ecuador.

Farook Yusoof

Program Manager

Recent Articles

Greetings from the New IDRF Board

Greetings from the New IDRF Board

Dear members of the community, supporters and friends, With the arrival of a New Year, comes an opportunity for all of us to reflect on the year that has passed and welcome the possibility of the year that is yet to unfold. Last year we faced COVID-19, in which many...

read more
Laura Buckley’s Perseverence

Laura Buckley’s Perseverence

Laura Buckley has faced hardships: After six years as a senior clerk at a digital media firm, her employer eliminated her position in a round of cutbacks. Around the same time, she discovered she was pregnant. Soon Laura became a single mother who needed to earn an...

read more